Posts tagged stars.

Möbius Arch Moonrise Image Credit & Copyright: Laurie Hatch

Möbius Arch Moonrise 
Image Credit & CopyrightLaurie Hatch

NGC 7331 and Beyond Image Credit & Copyright: Dietmar Hager, Torsten Grossmann

NGC 7331 and Beyond 
Image Credit & CopyrightDietmar HagerTorsten Grossmann

e4rthy:

Above the Horizon by Nathan Spotts
E4RTHY
gravitationalbeauty:

Sideways Orion Over Snowy Ireland
Milky Way, South Island, New Zealand

Milky Way, South Island, New Zealand

North Celestial Tree Image Credit & Copyright: Jerónimo Losada

North Celestial Tree 
Image Credit & CopyrightJerónimo Losada

Filaments of the Vela Supernova Remnant Image Credit & Copyright: Angus Lau, Y Van, SS Tong (Jade Scope Observatory)

Filaments of the Vela Supernova Remnant 
Image Credit & Copyright: Angus Lau, Y Van, SS Tong (Jade Scope Observatory)

All the Colors of the Sun Credit & Copyright: Nigel Sharp (NSF), FTS, NSO, KPNO, AURA, NSF
Explanation: It is still not known why the Sun’s light is missing some colors. Here are all the visible colors of the Sun, produced by passing the Sun’s light through a prism-like device. The spectrum was created at theMcMath-Pierce Solar Observatory and shows, first off, that although our white-appearing Sun emits light of nearly every color, it does indeed appear brightest in yellow-green light. The dark patches in the above spectrumarise from gas at or above the Sun’s surface absorbing sunlight emitted below. Since different types of gas absorb different colors of light, it is possible to determine what gasses compose the Sun. Helium, for example, wasfirst discovered in 1870 on a solar spectrum and only later found here on Earth. Today, the majority of spectral absorption lines have been identified - but not all.

All the Colors of the Sun 
Credit & CopyrightNigel Sharp (NSF), FTSNSOKPNOAURANSF

Explanation: It is still not known why the Sun’s light is missing some colors. Here are all the visible colors of the Sun, produced by passing the Sun’s light through a prism-like device. The spectrum was created at theMcMath-Pierce Solar Observatory and shows, first off, that although our white-appearing Sun emits light of nearly every color, it does indeed appear brightest in yellow-green light. The dark patches in the above spectrumarise from gas at or above the Sun’s surface absorbing sunlight emitted below. Since different types of gas absorb different colors of light, it is possible to determine what gasses compose the Sun. Helium, for example, wasfirst discovered in 1870 on a solar spectrum and only later found here on Earth. Today, the majority of spectral absorption lines have been identified - but not all.

NGC 7814: The Little Sombrero in Pegasus Image Credit & Copyright: Ken Crawford (Rancho Del Sol Obs.) Collaboration: David Martinez-Delgado ( ARI-ZAH, Univ. Heidelberg)

NGC 7814: The Little Sombrero in Pegasus 
Image Credit & CopyrightKen Crawford (Rancho Del Sol Obs.
Collaboration: David Martinez-Delgado ( ARI-ZAH, Univ. Heidelberg)

Comet Lovejoy with M44 Image Credit & Copyright: Damian Peach

Comet Lovejoy with M44 
Image Credit & CopyrightDamian Peach

A Spectre in the Eastern Veil Image Credit & Copyright: Alfonso Carreño (Observatorio Zonalunar)

A Spectre in the Eastern Veil 
Image Credit & CopyrightAlfonso Carreño (Observatorio Zonalunar)

NGC 7841: The Smoke Nebula in Frustriaus Image Credit & Copyright: Göran Strand

NGC 7841: The Smoke Nebula in Frustriaus 
Image Credit & CopyrightGöran Strand

NGC 7789: Caroline’s Rose Image Credit & Copyright: Albert Barr

NGC 7789: Caroline’s Rose 
Image Credit & CopyrightAlbert Barr

Horsehead and Orion Nebulas Image Credit & Copyright: Roberto Colombari & Federico Pelliccia
Explanation: The dark Horsehead Nebula and the glowing Orion Nebula are contrasting cosmic vistas. Adrift 1,500 light-years away in one of the night sky’s most recognizable constellations, they appear in opposite corners of the above stunning mosaic. The familiar Horsehead nebula appears as a dark cloud, a small silhouette notched against the long red glow at the lower left. Alnitak is the easternmost star in Orion’s belt and is seen as the brightest star to the left of the Horsehead. Below Alnitak is the Flame Nebula, with clouds of bright emission and dramatic dark dust lanes. The magnificent emission region, the Orion Nebula (aka M42), lies at the upper right. Immediately to its left is a prominent reflection nebula sometimes called the Running Man. Pervasive tendrils of glowing hydrogen gas are easily traced throughout the region.

Horsehead and Orion Nebulas 
Image Credit & Copyright: Roberto Colombari & Federico Pelliccia

Explanation: The dark Horsehead Nebula and the glowing Orion Nebula are contrasting cosmic vistas. Adrift 1,500 light-years away in one of the night sky’s most recognizable constellations, they appear in opposite corners of the above stunning mosaic. The familiar Horsehead nebula appears as a dark cloud, a small silhouette notched against the long red glow at the lower left. Alnitak is the easternmost star in Orion’s belt and is seen as the brightest star to the left of the Horsehead. Below Alnitak is the Flame Nebula, with clouds of bright emission and dramatic dark dust lanes. The magnificent emission region, the Orion Nebula (aka M42), lies at the upper right. Immediately to its left is a prominent reflection nebula sometimes called the Running Man. Pervasive tendrils of glowing hydrogen gas are easily traced throughout the region.

bright-eyedgallows:

Beauty of the Universe II - Colors

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